Interventions for children with speech and language difficulties

Speaking, listening, reading and writing are four aspects of language development that are at the core of the school curriculum. There is evidence that children with speech and language difficulties suffer difficulties with all four skills that adversely affect their educational progress and vocational prospects.

The project evaluated two theoretically motivated interventions for young children with speech and language difficulties. One intervention involved training phonological skills in the context of structured literacy teaching. A second intervention involved training children’s receptive and expressive oral language skills.

It was predicted that the phonological intervention would primarily facilitate children’s phonological and phonic (reading and spelling accuracy) skills, while the language intervention should have improved children’s receptive and expressive oral language skills.

Project details

 

Researchers

Professor Margaret Snowling, Professor Charles Hulme, Dr Jeremy Miles, Dr Julia Carroll, University of York

Funding Programme

Education

Grant amount and duration

£218,857
1 September 2004 - 31 December 2007

Publications

 

'Improving early language and literacy skills: differential effects of an oral language versus a phonology with reading intervention'. Bowyer-Crane C, Snowling M J, Duff, F J, Fieldsend  E, Carroll J M, Miles J, Goetz K and Hulme C, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 2007

An electronic version of the article can be downloaded from the project website.